V I S I O N

To make climate smart housing a mainstream for the marginalized.

 
 

M I S S I O N

To build climate resilient and green housing for low income communities.

WHY CLIMATE RESIlIENT HOUSING FOR    

LOW INCOME GROUPS ?

Climate change is a growing cause for the loss of livelihoods and devastated homes. Research shows that the poorest 20% on earth are 1.8 times more likely to live in fragile homes. 

Whether it be cyclones, floods, heatwaves, hurricanes, typhoons, earthquakes, forest fires, erratic or increased rainfall, the low-income communities are the most vulnerable groups to climate shocks. They are not only more exposed but also find it is very difficult to recover

and bounce back from these disasters.

 

The bottom of the pyramid is the most affected group by climate change, often driven into migration or homelessness.

 
 

WHY GREEN ?

Emissions related to the construction sector constitute around 40% of the total carbon emissions worldwide. Hence, any further addition in the building stock should be green, avoiding the mainstream methods that considerably contribute to aggravate the problem.

 

WHAT WE DO ?

We build climate resilient and green housing for low income groups, based on the six themes as mentioned below

 

GREEN MATERIAL
FOR CONSTRUCTION

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SANITATION

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ENERGY

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WASTE MANAGEMENT

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WATER

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FOOD SECURITY

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OUR PROCESS

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Taking inspiration from design thinking and adaptive innovation framework, we follow a process as mentioned below:

1. Inspiration

1.1 Household case studies
We conduct a case study, as the first step, to learn about the struggles of the household from the lens of climate change, housing, energy, water, sanitation, waste management, food, cooking and their larger community context. 

1.2 Region specific technical study
We conduct thematic studies (energy, construction material and techniques, water, cooking, waste and sanitation) using the framework of what was, what is and alternative possibilities, highlighting the pros and cons of each solution. 

2. Participatory Design and Planning
Using the learning from the inspiration phase, we design and plan with the household on the space design, material selection and costing. The idea is to play a facilitator’s role and provide all the possible information to help the household make a decision. 

3. Implementation
At this step, we facilitate the construction of the house. During the process, we also capture how the household interacts with and makes different decisions to build a climate resilient and green house. 

4. Handholding
This step is the second cycle of inspiration where we reflect on the entire journey from the household perspective and iterate if needed.

 
 

It is not for the engineer to decide what sort of house a man wants
to build, but it is the man who has decide what sort of house he wants and then ask the engineer to build it according to his wishes.

Laurie Baker (1917-2007)

 

CONTACT US

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